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Monthly Archives: July 2013

Microsoft is set to announce changes to the terms of reference for the hosting channel (service providers contracted under SPLA). This will result in a change in the T&C’s for the hosting community with the contract refresh coming in September 2013 with specific reference to how Service Providers can contract with end user customers. The current rule dictates that service providers cannot use end user customer hardware to provide hosting services using Microsoft technology. This direct correlation with hardware ownership is going to be replaced by the following “managed and controlled by service provider” on End User facilities.

Cormac

One of the more interesting tidbits we learned while at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference is that wait for Lync Voice breakout for O365 is over. At this year’s Microsoft World Wide Partner Conference, it was revealed that Microsoft will allow the hosting community to leverage Microsoft O365 E3 and E4 plan customers, to provide hybrid agreement multi-tenant Lync Voice services.

This allows service providers working under the SPLA framework to provide Lync hosting services with PSTN breakout, which integrates with their customers O365 tenancy.

For current Lync solution providers, this announcement bridges both a technical, infrastructure and licensing gap and aligns further Microsoft’s broad cloud approach from a partner perspective.

Interested? Then get in touch with us to discuss your options.

Cormac

TechNet Subscriptions, a paid service which allows IT Professionals to evaluate and plan MS deployments, is due to be retired on August 31st 2013.

Customers with active subscriptions will be able to access their program benefits through the end of their current subscription.

Microsoft’s ‘what now?’ information is a little confused here. They say they announced this 2 months in advance in order to allow people ample time to decide to purchase subscriptions. In the same breath they say that the ‘decision to retire the TechNet Subscription service does not impact the TechNet site’. Only time will tell if the free offering will be on a par with the current subscription offering.

That said, the current Evaluation Centre and Virtual Academy are also great resources, which certainly complement the TechNet offering.

For more on Microsoft’s decision to retire the TechNet Subscription service and the implications for current subscribers please review the Retirement FAQ.

So your new server is up and running and you have of course correctly licensed it with Windows Server 2012. Now you want to get on with the real task, installing SQL Server 2012. But what about the pesky licensing for SQL itself, well the licensing surrounding SQL Server can seem complicated initially but the basics are relatively easy to get a handle on.

First of all you’ll need to purchase the server license itself. You can choose between three options here*, depending on what you need to get done.

Starting at the top end, SQL Server 2012 Enterprise is what would be required for Mission Critical and Tier 1 applications, high availability and Data Warehousing. Click here for more information.
The ‘middle ground’ offering is new with the 2012 release – SQL Server 2012 Business Intelligence (BI). BI edition offers the full suite of powerful BI capabilities in SQL Server 2012, including PowerPivot and Crescent. One major focus of this edition is empowering end users with BI functionality. This will be ideal for projects that need advanced BI capabilities but don’t require the full OLTP performance and scalability of Enterprise Edition. It allows for ‘Managed self-service BI’ and scalable analytics. Click here for more information.

SQL Server 2012 Standard is the entry level SQL license for small to medium network scenarios. Standard edition is designed for departmental databases that require only basic database functionality and basic BI functionality. Click here for more information.

Standard suits most SMB scenarios – that said, the linked resources above should have all the information you need to decide which is right for your set-up.

CALs and Cores

As with the Windows Server licensing you will also need to license each user or device connecting to the server in question. Devices and Users are licensed by purchasing Client Access Licenses, or CALs. The type of CAL needed is usually decided by which is more cost effective, i.e. do you have more users or devices? There is however another option which allows unlimited users/devices – this is known as the ‘per core’ option.

Decisions, decisions…

As outlined above there are two distinct ways to license the CAL side of things. You can license the server and then each device or user connecting to it OR purchase a ‘per core’ SQL license. The ‘per core’ option licenses the server and allows an unlimited amount of devices or users to connect to it. If you go for the ‘per core’ model, you will need to license a minimum of 4 Cores per processor. The good news is that each license includes 2 cores, so your minimum purchase here will be 2 licenses. There is a ‘Core Factor’ that needs to be considered but in general it is simply 1:1. Learn more about the ‘Core Factor’ (PDF).

The decision (between CAL and Core model) may be influenced by the size of your network or by the role assigned to the SQL Server – for example, a web facing server with a limitless or unknown amount of devices and users connecting. If all this wasn’t complicated enough – Microsoft have restricted the CAL/Core option to certain SQL 2012 editions. So once you have an idea which model fits best you now have to weigh the answer against the available editions. To this end, SQL Standard 2012 can be licensed by one or other of these methods. SQL BI 2012 can only be licensed Server and CAL, while SQL Enterprise 2012 can only be licensed ‘per core’. So as you can see, your choice of SQL 2012 edition may be affected by both functionality and ‘target group size’. Here’s a handy chart that breaks down the edition functionality and the licensing options available for each:

SQL 2012 Editions Comparision

SQL 2012 Editions

Virtualisation Considerations
A common consideration when licensing SQL is the virtual environment you might be planning. In short you will need to license each individual VM or license all physical servers for Enterprise edition. Adding Software Assurance in both cases here will enable License Mobility. License Mobility is necessary if you need to re-assign the license within a 90 day timeframe, e.g. in a server farm.

This blog entry is meant as a beginners’ guide to licensing SQL as you can see, there are many nuances that can surface depending on the licensing scenario. Feel free to contact me if you have any queries or suggestions. Micromail is a Microsoft Gold Partner for Volume Licensing and provide licensing consultancy for SQL Server.

Sean Deasy.


*Excluding SQL Express, a product free-to-download – aimed at very small user scenario.