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Monthly Archives: June 2013

In the PUR it states that External User Access is licensed with Server. That looks simple enough, but what about this:

Under Additional Terms it states:

CAL Waiver for Users Accessing Publicly Available Content

CALs are not required to access content, information, and applications that you make publicly available to users over the Internet (i.e., not restricted to Intranet or Extranet scenarios).

This term might appear to limit the External User access right. Why else exclude Extranet scenarios from the CAL waiver? Doesn’t it appear to say in the above that content that is restricted to Intranet or Extranet scenarios does require a CAL? In other words, the PUR appears to be implying here that Extranet users require CALs, just as Intranet users do. As I read this Additional Term it means that the only circumstance in which no CALs are needed for external users is when all of the content is publically available.

However, the Microsoft Licensing Brief published in January 2013 http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/briefs/SharepointServer2013.aspx, contradicts this reading. In the Extranet scenario it states: The identifiable external users (educators from other universities) who are permitted to access otherwise restricted content inside the firewall do not require SharePoint CALs, because external user access is permitted under the server license.

Exchange Server 2013 also includes External User Access licensed with the server. But again there is an Additional Terms section which limits the applicability of the general condition. In this case external users must not authenticate via AD or Lync Server.

If we set the CAL waiver aside as a (temporary) distraction, then we could interpret the Licensing Brief consistently with the PUR as follows:

Private SharePoint sites require CALs for internal users (staff, onsite contractors) but not for external users (non-staff, but authenticated). This applies to Intranet and Extranet scenarios.

Public SharePoint sites don’t require CALs since, by definition, all information is publically accessible and users are not identified or authenticated.

 

Adobe Creative Cloud
With the major announcement of Creative Cloud at Adobe Max there has also been a degree of confusion around what is and what isn’t on available from Adobe. A closer examination of the offerings can sort the fact from the fiction.

Fact – Adobe is moving from a perpetual model to a subscription offering. Future product releases (including a major CC update in June) will only be available to customer under subscription.

Fact – CS6 will still be available to purchase for those who don’t wish to transition to the subscription offering.

Fact – With an Adobe subscription you’ll have access to the latest releases from Adobe, as soon as Adobe release them.

Fact – You can purchase Creative Cloud for teams from an Adobe Partner, not just from Adobe directly; contact us today for a competitive quote.

Fiction – Creative Cloud means I’ll be streaming the software and need to be always online. This is the biggest misnomer surrounding Adobe’s Creative Cloud offering. The software is installed locally on your computer (downloaded as it was before) and only requires internet activation every 30 days. Basically it’s exactly like your previous versions of Adobe except that now you have the option to access Cloud tools & services. The big change to remember is that Adobe are moving from perpetual purchasing to subscription; the delivery of the software isn’t changing.

Fiction – Perpetual purchasing has been removed. Not so. While Adobe are moving rapidly towards subscription, you will still be able to purchase CS6 perpetually.

Fiction – Only Creative Cloud customers will receive updates. Not entirely true; Educational customers with an EEA Agreement or Commercial/Government customers with an ETLA in place can also access new version releases. The key is to have an active subscription offering in place.

Fiction – You need to run the latest version of the software constantly. This is not the case; you can chose when to install updates, not have them forced on your by Adobe.

Hope this clears up some of the confusion for you, if not feel free to contact us for more information – Micromail is a certified Adobe partner.

Fionán Ó Cinnéide